The Gallipoli Association Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > Research > Naval Operations Research > Support Ships that served at Gallipoli.
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Trawler Manx Hero (Minsweeper Sunk 10/3/1915)
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

The Gallipoli Association Forum

Trawler Manx Hero (Minsweeper Sunk 10/3/1915)

 Post Reply Post Reply
Author
Message
Mal Murray View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 22 Apr 2010
Location: Ireland
Status: Offline
Points: 2366
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mal Murray Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Trawler Manx Hero (Minsweeper Sunk 10/3/1915)
    Posted: 23 Mar 2011 at 19:02
MANX HERO,
Admiralty trawler, 221/1910, W H Beeley, Grimsby-reg GY585, Hired 8/14 as minesweeper,
Armament = 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.339,
Skipper Edward Bray RNR.
 
One of seven trawlers with 3rd Minesweeping Group accompanied by two picket boats, four escorting destroyers and supported by battleship Canopus and light cruiser Amethyst, taking part in attempt to sweep Kephez minefields in the dark. Instead of sweeping against the strong 3-4kt current, the intention was to get above the first line of mines and sweep down. Trawlers reached their position, passed sweeps in pairs and started back. Night of 10th/11th - Two mines exploded, one of them possibly so close to Manx Hero she sank, otherwise she hit a third, Turks opened fire, two trawlers hit and damaged by 6in shells, all then retired under destroyer cover; no lives were lost in Manx Hero, crew picked up by HM Trawler Koorah.
 


Edited by Mal Murray - 30 Mar 2011 at 13:56
Back to Top
Mal Murray View Drop Down
Admin Group
Admin Group
Avatar

Joined: 22 Apr 2010
Location: Ireland
Status: Offline
Points: 2366
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mal Murray Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Mar 2011 at 13:56
The following information was extracted from the book, The Fleets behind the Fleet (The work of the Merchant Seaman and Fishermen in the War), by W. MacNeile Dixon (1917). The accoun refers to the action in which the Manx Hero was sunk.
 

Our Allies could bear witness to the work of British mine-sweepers and patrols in the Mediterranean. In one raid Austrian cruisers and destroyers attacked the patrol line in the Adriatic and sank 14 of our drifters. Our fishermen have swept for mines off Russian, French and Italian ports, and of their work at the Dardanelles all the world has heard. Captain Woodgate of the Koorah has vividly described an episode in which he was himself the protagonist.

 

''When we were up in the Dardanelles there were what we call three groups—One, Two and Three—and each group had to go up, one at a time. The vessel I was in belonged to the second group. The night we were going to make the final dash in the Dardanelles, up in the Narrows, we went, no lights up, everything covered in. They let us get right up to the Narrows, and as we turned round to take our sweeps up one of our number was blown up. Then they peppered us from each side, from one and a half to two miles. We heard cries for help. I said, 'We shall have to do the best we can, and go back and pick up.'

 

There was no waiting, no saying 'Who shall go As soon as I called for volunteers three jumped in. I kept the vessel as close as I could to shelter them. I did not think any would come back alive, but they did come back. No one was hit, and I; said, 'Now we'll get the boat in.' Just as we got the boat nicely clear of the water, along came a shot and knocked it in splinters. I shouted, 'All hands keep under cover as much as you can, ' and I got on the bridge, and we went full steam ahead. I could not tell you what it was like, with floating and sunken mines and shots everywhere. We got knocked about, the mast almost gone, rigging gone, and she was riddled right along the starboard side. One of the hands we picked up had his left arm smashed with shrapnel; that was all the injury we got.

 

When we got out the commander came alongside and said, 'Have you seen any more trawlers?' I said, 'Yes, we've got the crew of one on board, the Manx Hero.' We were the last out, and I can tell you I never want to see such a sight again. ... I thought of the three men in the fiery furnace, how they were preserved, and of Daniel in the lion's den, and I think of the 24 of us coming out under that terrible fire and the water covered with floating and sunken mines."

 

"There's one good thing about it," remarked a skipper who had his second vessel blown up under him,—"you take it calmer the second time."



Edited by Mal Murray - 30 Mar 2011 at 13:56
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 10.12
Copyright ©2001-2012 Web Wiz Ltd.