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George Leonard Cheesman

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MichaelBully View Drop Down
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Joined: 05 May 2012
Location: Hove
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    Posted: 26 Jun 2012 at 16:50

People who already know  me via the Great War Forum know that I have an interest in Gallipoli casualty George Leonard Cheesman  ( 14th September 1884- 10th August 1915) whose family were from Hove, where I live .

A historian of some renown , lecturing and researching at New College Oxford, Cheesman wrote a book about the Roman Army 'Auxilia of the Roman Imperial Army'  which is still cited as an important work today by historians of the Roman Army.
 
Joined up on 14th August 1914, Cheesman was serving with the 10th battalion of the Royal Hampshires when killed in action at Chunuk Bair  on 10th August 1915. His body was not recovered.
 
Would be pleased to hear from anyone else interested in Cheesman. Intrigued also by how Classical scholars would view Gallipoli campaign.
The Ancient Sages said, 'Do not despise the snake for having no horns, for who is to say it will not become a dragon'.
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Mal Murray View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mal Murray Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jun 2012 at 10:15
Hi Michael,
 
You raise an interesting point in relation to how classical scholars would view the Gallipoli campaign.
 
When it is considered that the Victorian and Edwardian era was steeped  in Homeric literature and that there were many reference in the contemporary press at the time to the Trojan wars and other Grecian heroic episodes, it is easy to see how comparisons were drawn.
 
The S.S. River Clyde was referred to as "The Trojan Horse" of the campaign, and there were many accounts of individual fights between Turkish and Allied soldiers which were redolent of the fight between Hector and Achilles.
 
Some of the poetry of time also uses the comparison between the campaign and the Trojan Wars.
 
So there is a lot to what you say, hopefully we might get some Classical Scholars opinions in the future.
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MichaelBully View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MichaelBully Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 30 Jun 2012 at 11:53
Hello Mal -my first response to what you have posted to is to imagine that a great deal would be based on the class background of those serving. That the Public School system of the time taught Greek and Latin so officers would be more likely to relate to the Classics.
Yet on the other hand that might just be an assumption on my part and not necessarily confirmed by the contemporary evidence.
Poetry was a lot more popular than it is today so Homeric themes could have been a wider reference point beyond those who had had Public School/University education.
The Ancient Sages said, 'Do not despise the snake for having no horns, for who is to say it will not become a dragon'.
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