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Gully Ravine WARNING

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ianphilliskirk View Drop Down
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    Posted: 21 May 2013 at 18:01

All

If you plan a walk into the wooded area above the Ravine entering into the woods near to the Essex Knoll or H12 trenches, on the ‘12 Tree Copse side’ please read.

I was at Gully Ravine 19 May. I walked all over the Boomerang, Broughton Street, Essex Street East, the Barricades, Border Trench, the Ravine itself, in the dense woodland.

We have had more than a fair share of rain this year and some parts of the Ravine has suffered serious rock falls - this is the yellow sandstone which lies underneath the earth and trees and woods. The various ‘streets’ and ravines down to Gully Ravine on this side, have become quite eroded and are in places precipitous, blocked by fallen tress, debris, stones or all.

BUT I WARN YOU NOT TO WALK TO THE EDGE OF the wooded vegetation above Gully Ravine unless you really can see it is safe and by safe I mean the lower ends at the mouth of Gully Ravine at the sea, or the Turkish front line area at it’s ‘head’. Or those paths that lead safely to the Ravine.

Where the sandstone has fallen or been eroded the earth has stayed ‘up’ and created a lip over hang in places. Some of it looked like it was 3-5 meters in depth out over the Ravine and 10-15 meters wide. It would be tempting to walk to the edge as it has trees and bushes. But the trees and bushes give a false impression that there is ground beneath and there simply is none!

I refer specifically to the Ravine edge [on the 12 Tree Copse side] being from ‘about’ G Bluff all the way through the Ravine -the Zig Zag, and particularly just beyond the Zig Zag above Turkey Trench, and the Boomerang where mainly this false sense of earthly security is.

The Ravine itself has a number of fallen tress which makes passage along this part ‘interesting’. There is some water in the Ravine, there are snakes about. But less ticks than a few weeks back. The amount of nightingales singing here is simply wonderful. Some will sing when only a few feet from you if you are 'resting' quiet and unobtrusive. 

I saw evidence of wild boar and they will have piglets with them at this time of year and must be considered dangerous. They have been in the fields of crops and the woods. But if you make enough noise you should be fine. (With luck they will either hear or smell you from afar and move off).

Ian  

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Mal Murray View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mal Murray Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 May 2013 at 08:05
Ian

Many thanks for this excellent situation report. I am sure it will come in useful.
To protect our history, we must secure it's future.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gully Ravine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 May 2013 at 12:42
Phew!  Thought I was in trouble ...
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Mal Murray View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mal Murray Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 May 2013 at 13:00
At your age , perhaps weather beaten and liable to collapse is a hint at changing your username.
To protect our history, we must secure it's future.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Gully Ravine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2013 at 13:47
You may well have a point ... I'll work on it!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote garrytrown Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Dec 2013 at 16:20
Hi,
 
Just read with interest you report on Gully Ravine and note you say there are snakes about, any idea what they were, are they venomous
 
Regards
 
Garry
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote ianphilliskirk Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jan 2014 at 17:42
Garry 
There are 40 types of venomous snakes in Turkey. Not all 40 are in Gallipoli!
I personally have seen four types of snakes. 3 venomous and one grass snake which is harmless. 
None have ever been aggressive and they have always been more frightened of me than I have of them. Or they were road kill. 

These are the four I have seen.
1. Brown. About 3-6 feet long. Often in grass. Thick body around the middle. Seen these Lala Baba, Suvla. And farmland. I have had one go over my feet when I was sat on stones near my house at Assos which was to say the least - interesting. It moved away very quickly. I think these are venomous but I am not sure. 
2. Adder/viper type. About 3 foot long. Whitish with the traditional zig-zag type black markings. Quite thin.   And the tail tapers to be very thin. [Dead on road below Plugge's]. 
2.1 I have also seen what looked like a viper type snake dead on the road near Ecebat was about 6 foot. That had yellowish under marking.
3. Black. These I have seen on Kirectepe Ridge. These were 2-3-4 feet long. Small. When getting near them walking, they scurry away very quickly. They didn't hang about. They have a blueish under side. Near my house at Assos I have see one of these that was 6-7 feet long. Thick body, as thick as a mans wrist. I was about three feet away from this one, it was slowly moving along grass/a wall. It ignored me completely. These are venomous. I have a friend who sent me a photo from Bodrum where a black snake was eating a viper. 
4. Grass snakes. Same as those in the UK. Often in water. Non-venomous. Greenish and a yellowish head with black marking. They eat tadpoles and frogs in the water in Gully Ravine.

Snakes 'hear' through their bones in the chin/head. So they feel vibration and movement. So when walking they will 'hear' you coming and scurry away. They sun them selves to warm up and can move very quickly often to get away.
You have to be completely irresponsible of unlucky to be bitten. Such as stand on one or pick one up. 
It's too cold for them now. I think they prefer mice & frogs to us! 

There are a large number of birds of prey in Turkey and there is one that specialises in eating snakes. They call it yilan kartal 'snake eagle'. 
I wouldn't worry about snakes it's the drivers you really need to worry about. 
Ian 
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