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The Dardanelles in Essex!

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Lone Pine View Drop Down
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    Posted: 10 Dec 2012 at 12:39

It appears that we have the Dardanelles in good old Essex. 

Its a stretch of water towards the back of Walton on the Naze (a place I know very well). I came across it quite by accident as was doing some research on the Essex Floods of 1953 and there it was.

Why it has been named as such I have no idea, but will contact Walton Council to try and find out more!

If you want to see for yourself, please type the following into a Google Map

The Dardanelles, Thorpe-le-Soken, Tendring District, Essex, United Kingdom

Edited by Lone Pine - 10 Dec 2012 at 12:39
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Mal Murray View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mal Murray Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Dec 2012 at 20:46
Hi Carole,
 
Thoughout Ireland there are places in the middle of nowhere that have the name "The Dardanelles", this has been attributed to the fact that after the war returning soldiers were given houses and plots of land.
 
Could be a similar reason.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lone Pine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2012 at 15:58
Nope not here, there are no houses nearby at all, it is in what they call the "backwaters" and its a muddy creek from what I can make out, anyway been in touch with the yacht club and boat yard and asked one of my friends, who is a yactsman as well.  So waiting for everyone to get back to me. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mal Murray Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Dec 2012 at 18:26
Most probably due to the Essex regiment involvement in the campaign.

You have me hooked and waiting for the answer.

Mal
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lone Pine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Dec 2012 at 16:23
Just got this:

QUOTE

Dear Carol,

I am 78 years old and have lived in Walton-on-the- Naze for the most of that time. Through the whole of my life the creek in question has always been known as 'The Dardanelles.'

I have asked several 'old Waltonians' and none of us has the answer to your question. However I will ferret around to see if I can find out and will contact you if I have any success.

UNQUOTE

Umm the plot thickens, will let you know if I get any response.



Edited by Lone Pine - 17 Dec 2012 at 16:23
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lone Pine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Sep 2014 at 13:56
It has been called the Dardanelles since WW1 and it was named after the Essex regiment who were at Gallipoli, its strange though to name a "creek" would thought street names were more the norm!
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Mal Murray Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Sep 2014 at 08:44
Maybe we are thinking soldiers (Essex Regiment) instead of Sailors. Perhaps there were a large group of men from the area who served in the navy (reservists etc).
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lone Pine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Sep 2014 at 11:26
Mal honestly if I had a brain I would be lethal, of course, some of the Essex boys lost their lives as the ship that was carrying them was torpedo.

Found this in Wikipedia

MV SOUTHLAND

During its sail from Egypt to Gallipoli on the 2 September 1915 at 9:45am it was torpedoed at right forward[5] by the German submarine UB-14 30 nautical miles (56 km) from Lemnos in the Aegean Sea. The ship did not sink immediately, and was eventually beached on Lemnos, and all but 40 of 1400 men were able to leave in lifeboats and were picked up by other transports and HT Neuralia, although mostly by HMS Ben-my-Chree by about midday though some troops spent up to 4 hours in the water. During the subsequent rescue operations Ben-my-Chree took on board 649 troops and 121 crew from 21 boats and rafts and provided medical attention as required until all were transferred to the troopship SS Transylvania in Mudros harbour. Southland eventually limped back to Mudros assisted by HMS Racoon and was repaired.

The sinking was reported as

"A Splendid story is told of the sinking of the transport Southland in the Mediterranean Sea. When the torpedo struck the vessel reeled and the order was given to abandon the ship. There was never a cry or sign of fear. The Australian soldiers merely came briskly on deck singing 'Australia will be there.'
The troops all went to their stations and lowered the boats in an orderly manner. The subalterns searched the interior of the ship for wounded and finally came on deck to find only the general staff on board. They helped to lower the last boats and got into a half swamped one themselves. Fourteen persons were killed by the explosion and twenty two were drowned including Brigadier General Linton."[6][7]

A record of this event is recorded in the war diary of Captain Herbert Franklin Curnow:

"Thursday 2 September
Up 6am. Drew 120 rounds of ammunition and iron and landing rations. Pulled into Lemnos and dropped anchor about 10am. The Military Landing Officer came on board, got my disembarkation return and meantime informed us that the Southland having on board 2 Aus Div H.Q 6th Inf Bge HQ., 21 Bt 1 Coy 23rd Btn. some A.S.C. A.M.C. & Signalling details had been torpedoed behind us. Later ascertained about 25 lives lost including Col Linton, Brigadier. Turned in soon after dinner."
However, a member of Australian unit reported one crew shot for behaving improperly.[5] The remaining men and ship's crew were able to get to the Allied vessels later the same day. HMT Southland carried James Martin whose experiences, and those of his friend Cecil Hogan, were described in a book by Anthony Hill.

The sinking was depicted in the painting Sinking of the Southland[8] by Fred Leist, who was appointed an official war artist in September 1917, and attached to the 5th Division AIF.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HALLIDAY6298 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Apr 2015 at 15:55
Hi there, been a while since we made contact If you remember My Uncle was killed at Gallipoli.He was a Harwich Essex boy. Born and raised in Harwich, which is in the TENDRING DISTICT,MAY BE A CONNECTION MAYBE NOT.
WILL YOU BE AT HORSE GAURDS ON SATURDAY 25 APRIL,IF YOU ARE MAY SEE YOU.
Regards Eric
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote HALLIDAY6298 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Apr 2015 at 16:05
Sorry, forgot to mention that he was with the 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers landed at V beach on the 23 April 1915 from the River Clyde
Eric
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Lone Pine Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jun 2015 at 10:30
Hi Eric

Sorry its taken so long to get back to you, no I was not in London on 25th April I was in Canakkale, and then went to the Peninsular on the 26th it was a promise I made to my Grandfather when I saw him, for the first time, 5 years ago, and I am pleased to say that my Husband and I was able to keep that promise, we went by cruise. It was simply amazing but extremely busy, but would not have missed it for the world. There were in total 9 cruise ships cruising ANZAC Cove on the 25th April just an amazing sight. At first the Turkish Government said no cruising, and then at 9am they changed there minds was absolutely thrilled to bits to be there.

Carole

Ps I still do live in Essex, Canvey Island to be precise.

Edited by Lone Pine - 29 Jun 2015 at 10:32
Grandaughter of William Pritchard KIA Lone Pine
Lone Pine! Lone Pine!For those who come no more

No bugle call can wake them from their slumber:

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